The Secret History by Stephanie Thornton

Title: The Secret History: A Novel of Empress Theodora
Author: Stephanie Thornton

Genre: Fiction (Historical / Turkey / 6th Century / Historical Figure Fictionalized / Sex Worker / Royalty / Royal Intrigue / Christianity)
Publisher/Publication Date: NAL Trade (7/2/2013)
Source: Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours

Rating: Liked a whole lot!
Did I finish?: I did, in a single night -- couldn't find a place to put the book down!
One-sentence summary: In 6th century Constantinople, a young prostitute rises through the ranks to become Empress of the Roman Empire.
Reading Challenges: Historical Fiction

Do I like the cover?: Oh, I do. It's probably not accurate, but oh, it's so exotic and pretty!

I'm reminded of...: Sandra Gulland, Philippa Gregory, Susan Holloway Scott

First line: My life began the night death visited our house.

Buy, Borrow, or Avoid?: Borrow or buy, especially if you like historical novels from the early medieval period

Why did I get this book?: Love Empress Theodora!

Review: Empress Theodora began as an actress and prostitute and became Empress of the Roman Empire. Her life reads like a soap opera, and in Thornton's hands, it's a fast, sex-filled (but not necessarily raunchy) historical novel that is perfect for the summer.

Theodora's story is not for prudish. After circumstances force her sister to become an actress -- which was a step up from a street prostitute -- Theodora becomes one as well. Not pretty exactly, but clever and smart, Theodora scrabbles her way to notoriety with a 'reenactment' of the Leda and the swan myth, becoming Constantinople's most talked about courtesan. After having a daughter she can barely care for, Theodora takes up with a merchant patron and leaves Turkey for North Africa, where she endures blackmail and abuse. (I'll admit, this section was almost too hard for me to stomach!)

She's dismissed and abandoned in Alexandria, Egypt, where she meets Severus, the Patriarch of Antioch, who takes her under his wing and tries to direct her toward a religious life. (Theodora, topically Christian, becomes baptized in a sect of Christianity less popular in the Empire.) After her return to Constantinople, a chance encounter with another famed courtesan gives her an introduction to the court of Justinian, the man thought to become Emperor after Justin, and from there, her life takes off in another tumultuous direction.

In a book with a sex worker as a heroine, it's important to me that the author treats our heroine well. However grotesque, grim, unfair, or unpalatable the life, it's crucial the characters be given respect and three-dimensional selves. Thornton does just that without either glorifying or victimizing her characters, and it tipped the book from 'good' to 'great'.

In fact, I found Thornton managed beautifully the dance required of a good historical novel: period details that gave me a sense of the era without overwhelming me, zippy plot that made it impossible for me to slip a bookmark between the pages and stop, and characters that I could respond to and relate with who didn't seem from the future.

That being said, those who are uncomfortable with the realities of life in this era will be, well, uncomfortable! Although Thornton ages Theodora up, children at this time became 'actresses' and prostitutes, and I'm grateful Thornton managed to make me more comfortable without completely anachronizing the era or Theodora's life.

I'd been waiting all year for this debut and it didn't disappoint. A beach-y historical novel in the vein, perhaps, of Philippa Gregory, I was also reminded of Sandra Gulland and Susan Holloway Scott -- authors who have heroines with big personalities and snappy, zippy, almost too-crazy-to-be-believed plot lines. Historical fiction fans should get this, as well as those who are interested in the Byzantine era, and anyone who wants a splashy novel that reads like a sexy tv series.

*** *** ***

GIVEAWAY!

I'm thrilled to offer one lucky reader a paperback copy of The Secret History and a Byzantine coin!

To enter, fill out this brief form. Open to US and international readers, ends 8/2.

Be sure to return tomorrow for an interview with author Stephanie Thornton!


Comments

  1. So many good reviews for this one! I was a bit worried about the handling of the prostitution storyline. Your review did a great job of addressing that aspect of the book. Now I will definitely find a way to get this one!

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    1. It was very well done -- it's there, and open, without shame, for which I'm grateful. I hope you get to read it!

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  2. I imagine a lot of people will love this one but I don't think it's for me.

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  3. Have you read the original Secret History by Procopius. It was the unoffical as opposed to the official history of Byzantium under Theodora and Justiniun. It is short and sounds a lot like this one as far as the content http://rannthisthat.blogspot.com/2006/08/kids-books-and-our-reaction.html

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    1. RAnn, Thornton says Procopius' work was the inspiration for her story. She argues he had an axe to grind against them, hence the crazy lasciviousness, but it provided some historical details/tidbits.

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  4. Wow, this sounds really good -- great review. I haven't read much about the Byzantine Empire, but the little I have read was fascinating. Thanks for pointing this one out!

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    1. Col -- super fun -- fast and amusing with enough gritty, real life detail to keep it from getting out-and-out fluffy.

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  5. It sounds a difficult read but worth it! I was thinking this was another book (can't remember the author but it was about Theodora) and I like that there are a few books around about her.

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    1. Stella Duffy wrote a Theodora novel, which I bought after DNFing it initially, when I saw her at HNS Conference -- she was uh-mah-zing. And Theodora is pretty badass so the increased interest makes me happy!

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  6. This sounds very good and I've read lot of good reviews of this. Haven't read any books about Theodora so this would be interesting.

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  7. Fabulous review, Audra! I'm looking forward to reading this one.

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  8. I passed on this one bc I am so lacking in background for this era...as well as the possibility that the subject matter would be handled poorly. Now I wish I hadn't let this one slip by :)

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  9. I don't know a darn thing about Theodora! I need to remedy that darn it. I'm totally entering the giveaway :D Thanks!

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  10. I've got this one on my reader to read soon so I'm glad you liked it so much!

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  11. I do want to read it as she sounds fascinating :D Though that tough section...scared

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  12. Though I've heard of Theodora I really don't know anything about her, and it sounds like that's a shame. So glad that Thornton manages to handle this subject without romanticizing or condemning it. That can sink a story so quickly. Hmmm, not sure if this is the Theodora book I want, though, if she's aged up. Also, the comparison to Gregory makes me hesitant.

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    1. Christina -- I compared her to Gregory in that she makes Theodora's story very splashy -- and there are sexytimes, more than once -- so it's like her books more than, say, Sharon Kay Penman. But I found it still historically grounded.

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  13. Oh I'm glad you loved it - I did too!! The cover is one of my favorites this year - it is so pretty and atmospheric. Loved this author!

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