Tuesday Memes featuring The Wake by Paul Kingsnorth

I'm seriously dithering on post-2015 blog work and so I'm behind on 2016 blog work. I've resolved to give myself a pass on this.

My first read for 2016 is The Wake by Paul Kingsnorth, a challenging read to kick off the year with -- but one I've been curious about and have had blogger friends squee over.

It's a particularly interesting read for me at the moment, as aspects of our hero's feelings echo some of the sentiment shared by those engaged in the Oregon paramilitary standoff. (This is one of the many reasons I'm so passionate about historical fiction; I'm wrestling with complicated issues on politics, government, and self rule when I honestly might have otherwise resorted to glib shoulder shrugs.)

In addition to the current events-y connection, the language in this book has been very thought-provoking, as the author has invented a language meant to evoke Old English. So, some excerpts and teasers so you all can share in the linguistical snakiness!

First Chapter First Paragraph, hosted by Bibliophile by the Sea:
the night was clere thought i slept i seen it. thought i slept i seen the calm hierde naht only the still. when i gan down to sleep all was clere in the land and my dreams was full of stillness by dreams did not cepe me still
Bananas, right??? After three days, I'm only 20 pages in, but it is getting easier.

Teaser Tuesday, hosted by A Daily Rhythm
our fathers was freer than us our fathers fathers stalcced the wilde fenns now the fenns is bean tamed efry thing gets smaller. for efry cilde born there is sum new law a man sceolde be free and alone on his land the world sceolde not cum in until he ascs it. freodom sceolde there be in angland again lic there was in the eald daegs in the first daegs of the anglisc (p4)

It was this passage that actually gave me pause and made me think of the standoff in Oregon; the situation evokes complicated feelings in me, and I'm grateful (if not a little discomfited) this novel is making me wrestle a little more with the issue.

What are you reading this week? Share your Teasers with me!

Comments

  1. I thought this book was so fascinating, in what the author was trying to do. It ended up being too challenging for me, though I even studied Old English in my younger days - I guess that's way too many years behind.... But I noticed it was a bit easier when I was trying to read it aloud. I should get back to it and persevere, you are right, it should get easier as you get used to it.

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  2. I am not familiar with this book, but it does sound interesting. I like it when I am able to make connections between a book I am reading and what is going on in the outside world or even just in my life. It adds to my enjoyment of a book, I think.

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  3. I like the idea of learning more about the historical elements...the language does give me pause, though. Thanks for sharing, and here's mine: “FLYING SHOES”

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  4. The language wouldn't work for me. I can't stand books written in dialect or non-standard English. My teaser comes from The Bitter Season by Tami Hoag. Happy reading!

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  5. I've heard good things about this book, but I don't think I'd have the patience for the writing. I do like it's connection to current political events, though.

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  6. I'd have to be in the right mood to wade through this, but it sounds like it would be worth the effort.
    My Tuesday post features JEWEL.

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  7. Oh gosh, I'm not sure about this. I can handle dialect but this might be too much for me.

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  8. Audra, first - thanks for joining us today - your kitty is adorable. As for the intro, I would not have the patience for this one I know for sure. I can see why it's been a slow read for you. I hope you find it's worth the effort.

    BTW - Happy New Year.

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  9. Hmmm....I don't think I have enough patience for it either, but I admire you for trying. Good luck!

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  10. I saw your GR updates and was curious what you meant by the language. ...yikes. I'm glad it's now picking up, but I don't think that would be a lazy day kind of read for me!

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