Posts

Showing posts from September, 2016

Weekend reads and chilly times...

Image
It's been a crazy week in a crazy busy month. The flowers pictured were a thank you from my staff group after our retreat this week. It was wonderful to see all my colleagues in person and rejuvenating to my work, and the flowers were just icing on an already delicious cake.

The orange folder you see peeking out from the corner contains notes from my Novel Generator classes. I can't believe it, but I'm one of 14 novelists who are in this program, which is designed to help writers finish a first draft in nine months. I just finished up the second session last week, and I've already learned so much.

I'm returning to my novel idea from my 2013 sabbatical, the historical novel set during the pre-Civil War years known as Bleeding Kansas. It's a novel that daunts me so I'm really hopeful this course will help me learn craft as well as hone in on the kind of research I still need. (The overwhelming research and deep themes are partially why I abandoned my horrid …

Book Review: The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead

Image
Title:The Underground Railroad
Author: Colson Whitehead

First line: The first time Caesar approached Cora about running north, she said no.

Review: This novel, a new Oprah pick, imagines the Underground Railroad as a literal railroad. Our heroine Cora escapes on it with another slave, Caesar, and they travel through the south in hopes on making it up north to freedom.

Though a real railroad, it doesn't offer a direct route to freedom: each passenger must choose a route and hope the station at the end is open. Cora and Caesar find themselves first in "liberal" South Carolina, but paradise is tainted (perhaps my favorite chapter, brilliantly recasting actual history). From there, Cora lands in places worse and less worse as she travels the rail line.

While the majority of the novel is in Cora's point-of-view, about a third of the novel follows Ridgeway, the slave catcher pursuing Cora -- fueled by his lingering fury at not catching Cora's mother decades earlier. Ther…

Teaser Tuesday, September 20

Image
Teaser Tuesday is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by MizB of Books And A Beat.

I'm currently reading Anne Boileau's historical novel about Martin Luther's wife, Katharina Luther: Nun, Rebel, Wife.

This teaser is from the start of the novel, as a pregnant Katharina, a former nun married to a former monk, faces intense derision from the townsfolk.
I longed to return to the security and anonymity of my life in the convent. Or to my time with the Cranachs, when I was just one of the fugitive nuns, of no great import; I could go about my business without anyone taking any notice. But when I married Martin I became famous, like him; many people respected me because they knew and liked us both; but others were afraid of me, even hostile, and no longer honest. So that Friday morning in April I felt all the doors closing upon me. I felt trapped from without by hostility and malevolence, and from within by the child growing in my belly, a child which some say is an evil thing, the Anti…

Mailbox Monday, Sept 19

Image
Since I've seriously scaled back on my reviews (and then, frankly, stopped doing pretty much any not associated with a tour, le sigh!), I've not got gotten as many unsolicited copies any more. It bums me out from a blogger perspective, in that it's one big indication that I'm not as active here as I should be, but on the other hand, I'm grateful I don't have to deal with the clutter of books I probably won't read.

I'm still a bit free with my requests for e-book ARCs, however, and I have been chewing through a handful of those this year. Here are some recent arrivals on this Mailbox Monday. What have you gotten? Any of these appeal to you?

Print Copies

Whitney Taylor, Definitions of Indefinable Things Elsa Hart, Jade Dragon Mountain
Ebook Copies



Kate Howard, The Ornatrix Sara Flannery Murphy, The Possessions Laurie Notaro, Crossing the Horizon


Aprilynne Pike, Glitter John Pipkin, The Blind Astronomer's Daughter Jason Porath, Rejected Princesses: Tale…

Giveaway Winner!

Image
Late...but better late than never, right?

The winner of The Dark Lady's Mask is ... Joel N.!

Congrats! I've got a few more giveaways coming up (including an international one!), so be sure to check my blog this week and next. Hope everyone has been having a lovely weekend!

Book Review: Without a Summer by Mary Robinette Kowal

Image
Title:Without a Summer
Author: Mary Robinette Kowal

First line: Jane, Lady Vincent could never be considered a beauty, but possessed of a loving husband and admirable talent, had lived thirty years in the world with only a few events to cause her any true distress or vexation.

Review: This is the third book in Kowal's Glamourist series, a series of historical fantasies set during the English Regency, following glamourists Jane and her husband Vincent. (Here are my reviews for the first book and the second.)

After their tumultuous run in with Napoleon's forces while in Belgium, Jane and Vincent are back in the UK with Jane's family. Commissioned by an Irish Catholic family to do some glamour, Jane and Vincent find themselves becoming embroiled in a political plot against the coldmongers, who are being blamed for the unseasonably cold weather that summer.

Kowal picks up some of the emotional threads from the previous book, most notably Jane's sister Melody's moodiness…

Bloggiesta To Do; or, getting stuff done

Image
I was just bemoaning on Twitter that I don't know how to get back into reviewing when someone suggested Bloggiesta, the quarterly marathon housekeeping blogging event to help bloggers do the stuff that keeps a blog spiffy and sharp. I always mean to participate, and never seem to pay attention to the dates, so I'm grateful the universe made me whine online at just the right time!

In looking at the list of books I still need to review, I realized if I actually did them all now, I'd have a review to post every weekday for a month. (!) It's ridiculous -- especially as most of the un-reviewed books are five star squeefests -- they deserve some love!

Anyway, here's hoping doing some blog work with the support/pressure of others doing the same will be motivation. Lots of folks advised me to try doing minireviews, so I'm going to aim for that as well -- better say a little something than a lot of nothing, right??

My to-do for this fall's Bloggiesta, which runs th…

Interview with Mary Sharratt

Image
I recently read, and luuuuurved, Mary Sharratt's historical The Dark Lady's Mask, a biographical novel about Elizabethan poet Aemlia Lanier. I'm thrilled to share this interview with Ms. Sharratt. She talks about this book as well as her past books, and introduces me to the word "powerfrau" (!). Read on to learn more!

Was The Dark Lady's Mask the original title of your book?

Yes, although in the beginning, I was debating whether to call it THE DARK LADY’S MASK or THE DARK LADY’S MASQUE after the court masques that were the only venues in England at that time in which women could act upon the stage—because they were wearing masks! I opted for THE DARK LADY’S MASK. Concealment and revelation form a major theme in the book.

As you were writing The Dark Lady's Mask, was there a particular scene or character that surprised you?

Aemilia’s husband, Alfonse Lanier, surprised me.

This was not a match made in heaven. When Aemilia discovered herself pregnant with t…